We change daily as we grow, as we gain new experiences, and as we develop as humans. The software and hardware that we work with also change continuously. Synchronizing the two--people and technology--becomes a tug–of-war with each side demanding superiority and our fully focused attention.



“A long habit of not thinking a thing wrong, gives it a superficial appearance of being right, and raises at first a formidable outcry in defense of custom. But the tumult soon subsides. Time makes more converts than reason” -Thomas Paine

There is a wealth of historical writings of American culture that grace the wooden recesses of many a bookshelf. Recently, one in particular caught my gaze. I could not help but draw a parallel between the Common Sense writings of Thomas Paine and the battles that are continually being fought to bring forward a new era of technological thinking, especially when you are the agent of change.

As technology marches on and stretches our capacity to grasp newer methodologies of working with computers, a key point surfaces in the dynamics created between changing the technology and altering the existing people and processes.

No one likes change; change breaks our rhythm, our “feel-safe” zones, and our ability to over-perform at a predetermined rate in front of our peers. Yet we ourselves change daily. We change as we grow, as we gain new experiences, and as we develop as humans. So, too, does the software and the hardware that we work with. Synchronizing the two becomes a tug–of-war with each side demanding superiority and our fully focused attention.

Managing the changing of technology, then, becomes a balancing act, a give and take, where gaining the best possible solution is the point at which the people and the technology meet and begin to grow, albeit rooted firmly in a bed richly amended with compromises.


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