Joke of the Week: A Senior Moment
Problem of the Week: Surveying Instruments and Procedures: Definitions
Cool Link of the Week: Yosemite Panoramic Imaging Project

Each week, we present a surveying problem for you to solve from the third edition of “Surveying Solved Problems for the FS and PS Exams” by Jan Van Sickle, PLS (formerly "1001 Solved Surveying Fundamentals Problems"), some jokes, trivia or other amusing items and a cool link to brighten your day. If you have a joke or link you would like to share, please submit it to ornekianl@bnpmedia.

Joke of the Week: A Senior Moment

A police car pulls up in front of grandma Bessie's house.
 
The car door opens, and grandpa Morris gets out.
 
The polite policeman escorts him up to the house.
 
"This elderly gentleman said that he was lost in the park and couldn't find his way home," he explains to grandma Bessie.  

"Oh, Morris," grandma says. "You've been going to that park for over 30 years! How could you get lost?" 

He leans close to grandma so that the policeman can't hear.
 
"I wasn't lost," grandpa Morris whispers. "I was just too tired to walk home."


Problem of the Week: Surveying Instruments and Procedures: Definitions

The four points of the compass - north, south, east, and west - are known by what common name?

A. occidental directions
B. collimation directions
C. oriental directions
D. cardinal directions

This is problem 2 (6-1) from the NEW third edition of “Surveying Solved Problems for the FS and PS Exams” by Jan Van Sickle, PLS (formerly "1001 Solved Surveying Fundamentals Problems"). Reprinted with permission from “Surveying Solved Problems for the FS and PS Exams” by Jan Van Sickle, PLS (2008 Professional Publications Inc.). For details on this and other FLS exam-prep books, call 800/426-1178 or visit www.ppi2pass.com  



Cool Link of the Week: Yosemite Panoramic Imaging Project

The Yosemite Panoramic Imaging Project, a partnership between the National Park Service and Los Angeles-based xRez Studio, has stitched together a single image of Yosemite Valley by combining 3.8 gigapixel panoramic photography with LiDAR-based digital terrain modeling and 3D computer rendering--representing one of the world’s largest photographic captures of a single area.