It has been 25 years since Ruby and Richard Evans moved from the Hoosier State to southwestern Michigan, but the retired couple could one day find themselves back home in Indiana without having left their current house.


By JAMES PRICHARD | Associated Press Writer
November 16, 2008
 
NILES TOWNSHIP, Mich. - It has been 25 years since Ruby and Richard Evans moved from the Hoosier State to southwestern Michigan, but the retired couple could one day find themselves back home in Indiana without having left their current house.
 
For several years, land surveyors searched the 104-mile-long border between Michigan and Indiana for the wooden mileposts that were installed when the state line originally was staked out in 1827. Although a few markers were found, nearly all had rotted away long ago, blurring the exact location of the border that stretches from southern Lake Michigan to Ohio's northwestern corner.
 
Surveyors from both states have started talking to lawmakers about the need to install new, permanent markers and re-establish the border. Once that happens, property that for years was believed to lie in one state could turn out to be in another, creating quandaries regarding property and income taxes, police jurisdictions, school districts and numerous other matters.