Each week GeoDataPoint finds a selection of good reads related to hot topics in the geospatial community. This week, learn how archaeologists are employing drones, the most high-tech of tools, to discover and protect the most ancient of artifacts; read about surveyors who made a journey to the top of Europe's highest peak, Mont Blanc, to take the first ever 3D laser scan of the shape and volume of the mountain's ice cap; check out PBS' report on drones taking flight in Alaska to survey wildlife; and FAA administrator Michael Huerta talks to NPR about safety and privacy concerns with regulating drones.

  • Can Drones Revolutionize Archaeology? From the History Channel: "While drones have generated controversy for their use in war zones as well as fascination for their potential use in delivering everything from pizzas to packages, unmanned aerial vehicles also hold the promise to revolutionize archaeology. Learn how archaeologists are employing the most high-tech of tools to discover and protect the most ancient of artifacts."
  • 3D Imaging Maps Europe's Highest Peak: "A team of surveyors from multiple organizations recently made a journey to the top of Europe's highest peak, Mont Blanc, to take the first ever 3D laser scan of the shape and volume of the mountain's ice cap. Surveyors from Leica Geosystems France and chartered land surveyors of the upper Savoy region of France were accompanied by technical partners from Géomédia and Teria , guides, a photographer, and a cameraman."
  • Drones take flight in Alaska to survey wildlife: "Alaska’s drone test site, one of six U.S. research locations selected to develop guidelines for “unmanned aircraft systems,” or drones, became operational Monday, the Federal Aviation Administration said. The FAA authorized the University of Alaska in Fairbanks to conduct wildlife surveys for two years, using the small, 3-pound Aeryon Scout aircraft."
  • FAA Head: Safety, Privacy Concerns Abound In Regulating Drones: "A number of federal agencies are grappling with rules around drones as the popularity of the unmanned aircraft is rising. The National Park Service their use in Yosemite, and the Federal Aviation Administration is under orders from Congress to safely integrate unmanned aircraft into U.S. airspace by September 2015. FAA Administrator Michael Huerta tells NPR's Robert Siegel that in writing the rules, the administration is most concerned with the safety of the national airspace."