Point of Beginning

Mark your land so they understand

September 23, 2009
Marking your property borders with visible signs will help you avoid headaches during hunting season. Having clear property borders and signs makes prosecution of criminal trespassing easier, prevents people in your party from wandering onto other people's property, and lets outside individuals know the land is currently owned or leased by a hunting club.


By John Howle
Special to The Cleburne News
09-17-2009
  
Plots have been planted, forage has been fertilized, and you are bow hunting from a perch with a bird's eye view of a hot scrape and rub line in a remote section of your property. Tension builds as you wait for the appearance of a mature buck meandering down the trail with his nose to the ground.

The moment is lost when you hear ATV engines buzzing like a swarm of angry bees heading through the woods. As the riders blaze down the trail laughing and shouting at each other passing within 100 yards of your stand, your blood begins to boil. Once you calm down, you realize you forgot to mark the boundaries of your property with posted signs stating that this land is privately owned or leased.
 
Marking your property borders with visible signs will help you avoid headaches during hunting season. Having clear property borders and signs makes prosecution of criminal trespassing easier, prevents people in your party from wandering onto other people's property, and lets outside individuals know the land is currently owned or leased by a hunting club. ...