Point of Beginning

Layton Graphics Inc. to Serve on Standards Committee for PDF Uses in Engineering 3.16.04

March 16, 2004
The committee will create a draft for presentation to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) for development and approval as an International Standard.

Layton Graphics Inc. announced its participation on a committee assembled to advance standards and best practices for the use of the Adobe Portable Document Format in engineering applications (PDF/E). The group represents a collaborative effort by AIIM International, the international authority on Enterprise Content Management and NPES, the association for suppliers of printing, publishing and converting technologies. In addition to Layton Graphics, the PDF/E Working Group includes executives from leading international corporations including, Adobe Systems Incorporated, Agile, Bentley Systems, Hewlett-Packard, Océ, Intel, PTC, Dell, UGS PLM Solutions and others who will begin work on a new standard for document collaboration and exchange across specific engineering processes. The group will create a draft for presentation to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) for development and approval as an International Standard. The proposed draft will be submitted in December 2004 with an estimated publication date of mid-2006.

According to a recent AIIM press release: "PDF is a ubiquitous, recognized de facto standard for eliminating critical barriers that prevent formatted information and graphics from moving between computers. The format has also evolved to support business documents capable of driving processes such as procurement. Engineering professionals already widely use PDF to speed the document review process, ensure document control, and allow easy creation of searchable electronic archives for standard-sized documents."

With the release of Adobe Acrobat Professional 6.0, Adobe Systems has introduced significant new features for the engineering user. As the use of PDF in engineering applications increases, many companies have expressed a need for standard ways of publishing, exchanging and archiving their design data.

Source: Layton Graphics, March 10, 2004