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NASA Uses Photogrammetry

August 10, 2005
Cardinal Systems' Vr mapping software has provided the shuttle program with a three-dimensional detailed assessment of the depth and volume of the damage.

NASA is utilizing Cardinal Systems' VrOne and VrTwo photogrammetric mapping software. Using imagery from the umbilical well camera system obtained during launch of the Space Shuttle Discovery on July 26, Vr software is being used to create three-dimensional maps of the damaged portions of the external fuel tank as it was jettisoned.

Foam near an aerodynamic ramp and the cable tray was dislodged during launch, and Vr mapping software has provided the Shuttle program with a three-dimensional detailed assessment of the depth and volume of the damage.

Combining two photographs taken from different vantage points creates the three-dimensional view on a computer monitor. Stereo glasses are worn to enable the technician to see the area in three-dimension as if he(she) were there. The software allows exact measurements to be made and an accurate map to be created for further analysis.

Viewing the damaged in three dimensions offers a more realistic view of the area and has the potential of giving NASA engineers a better idea of why the damage occurred.

Cardinal's Mike Kitaif and Tom Blankenship are heading to Mission Control in Houston, Texas to assist in evaluating damage to the tank and to further explore possible damage to the exterior of the Shuttle.

Source: Cardinal Systems LLC, July 28, 2005